New Orleans LaToya Cantrell withdrawal petition filed

A withdrawal petition has been formally filed against New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell. The petition was filed by community activist Belden Batiste, who is a Mardi Gras Indian and longtime candidate for office, and Eileen Carter, who is a former City Hall staffer and sister of Karen Carter Peterson. This comes after members of the public criticized his handling of violent crimes and his recent travels. Louisiana’s Secretary of State confirmed the withdrawal petition was formally filed on Friday. This means the watch has officially started removing Cantrell from the office. According to the Louisiana Secretary of State’s Office, 20% of eligible voters, who are eligible voters, need to sign the petition. There are 266,714 eligible voters in the Parish of Orleans. Of that number, 53,000 signatures were needed. The signature is required within 180 days from Friday. If that is achieved, the recall will be granted to the Registrar of Electors in New Orleans and from there Governor John Bel Edwards must hold special elections. If signatures are collected, Cantrell will be allowed to appeal. An online petition has been circulating on social media, but documents filed on Friday made the process official. The petition received more than 2,000 signatures. A spokesman for the Mayor of New Orleans LaToya Cantrell issued a statement Thursday regarding the potential recall. “The mayor works 24 hours a day, seven days a week to solve the city’s problems,” said the director of the Mayor’s Office of Communications, Gregory Joseph. Joseph spoke with WDSU about concerns from the public and chat about re-election. The secretary of state’s office said they had not received a form to initiate a withdrawal. “Be it public safety, sanitation, development. This mayor cares about everyone in the city and lifts the city up. This is a world-class city, and we will continue to strive to make it as good as possible, which is what he will continue to do,” said Joseph. “This is a very fragile political and social environment,” WDSU political expert Silas Lee said. “In 30 years In my public opinion research, I have never seen such a level of fragility among voters. Keep in mind that there is chat but where does the chat come from? Are they registered in New Orleans? For the withdrawal to be successful you need an infrastructure organization like a campaign you need resources, money, technology and people. This will be a challenge. has received quite a number of signatures. Only two of these withdrawal attempts were successful. The last time a recall was made in Southeast Louisiana was in 2016 for then Jefferson Parish President Mike Yenni following the texting scandal with the teen mall e. In this case, Yenni’s attempt to recall failed because not enough signatures were secured. To view the full petition, click here.

A withdrawal petition has been formally filed against New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell.

The petition was filed by community activist Belden Batiste, who is a Mardi Gras Indian and longtime candidate for office, and Eileen Carter, who is a former City Hall staffer and sister of Karen Carter Peterson.

This comes after members of the public criticized his handling of violent crimes and his recent travels.

Louisiana’s Secretary of State confirmed the withdrawal petition was formally filed on Friday.

This means the watch has officially started removing Cantrell from the office.

According to the Louisiana Secretary of State’s Office, 20% of eligible voters, who are eligible voters, need to sign the petition.

There are 266,714 eligible voters in the Parish of Orleans. Of that number, 53,000 signatures were needed.

The signature is required within 180 days from Friday.

If that is achieved, the recall will be granted to the Registrar of Electors in New Orleans and from there Governor John Bel Edwards must hold special elections.

If signatures are collected, Cantrell will be allowed to appeal.

An online petition has been circulating on social media, but documents filed on Friday made the process official. The petition received more than 2,000 signatures.

A spokesman for the Mayor of New Orleans LaToya Cantrell issued a statement Thursday regarding the potential recall.

“The mayor works 24 hours a day, seven days a week to solve the city’s problems,” said the director of the Mayor’s Office of Communications, Gregory Joseph.

Joseph spoke with WDSU about concerns from the public and chat about re-election. The secretary of state’s office said they had not received a form to initiate a withdrawal.

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“Be it public safety, sanitation, development. This mayor cares about everyone in the city and lifts the city up. This is a world-class city, and we will continue to strive to make it as good as possible, which is what he will continue to do,” said Joseph.

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“This is a very fragile political and social environment,” said WDSU political expert Dr. Silas Lee. “In my 30 years of public opinion research, I have never seen such a level of vulnerability among voters. Keep in mind that there is chat but where does the chat come from? Are they registered in New Orleans? For a successful withdrawal you need an infrastructure organization just like a campaign, you need resources, money, technology and people. It will be a challenge.”

Historically, withdrawal attempts have rarely gotten enough signatures.

The State Secretariat’s office confirmed that only six withdrawals since 2014 had enough signatures. Only two of those withdrawal attempts were successful.

The last time a recall was made in Southeast Louisiana was in 2016 for then Jefferson Parish President Mike Yenni following a texting scandal with a teenage boy.

In this case, Yenni’s attempt to recall failed because not enough signatures were secured.

To view the full petition, click here.

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